The War Shifts to the South (1778-1780) - Research Article from American Revolution Reference Library

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 10 pages of information about The War Shifts to the South (1778–1780).
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In the spring of 1778, William Howe (1729–1814) received word that his resignation as commander in chief of British forces in America had been accepted. He would be able to return to England as soon as his replacement, Henry Clinton (1738–1795), arrived in Philadelphia. The much-criticized Howe resigned because he felt that the British government had not sent him enough troops; without them, he said, he could not be expected to win the Revolutionary War.

In June 1778, Clinton learned that the French had joined forces with the Americans. Fearful that the French navy would cut him off from British headquarters in New York, Clinton quickly abandoned Philadelphia and headed for New York. George Washington (1732–1799) set up camp at West Point, New York.

For the next two years, there were no important battles in the North, although sporadic fighting did...

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This section contains 2,758 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The War Shifts to the South (1778-1780) Encyclopedia Article
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