The Nation - Research Article from St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 5 pages of information about The Nation.
This section contains 1,389 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
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The Nation

America's oldest continuously published weekly magazine, The Nation has maintained a consistent liberal/radical outlook since its founding, in 1865, by a group of abolitionists just at the end of the Civil War. Among the causes advocated by the magazine over the years have been labor unionism in the late 1800s, the formation of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) in the early 1900s, the Sacco and Vanzetti case in the 1920s, anti-McCarthyism in the 1950s, the civil-rights and anti-war movements of the 1960s, and countering Reaganomics in the 1980s. Its contributing writers over the years have included many of the nation's most prominent figures in politics, the arts, education, and literature, such as W. E. B. Du Bois, H. L. Mencken, Willa Cather, Eleanor Roosevelt, James Baldwin, Jean-Paul Sartre, Cesar Chavez, Ralph Nader, E. L. Doctorow, and Toni...

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This section contains 1,389 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Nation Encyclopedia Article
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The Nation from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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