Taiwanese Americans - Research Article from Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 31 pages of information about Taiwanese Americans.
This section contains 9,112 words
(approx. 31 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Taiwanese Americans Encyclopedia Article

Taiwanese Americans

Overview

History

The derivation of the Chinese word Tai-wan is unknown, though its literal meaning is "terraced bay." Until the sixteenth century, Taiwan was primarily inhabited by its native Malayo-Polynesian population. In Chinese records prior to the Han dynasty (206 B.C.-222 A.D.), Taiwan was referred to as Yangchow, then later Yinchow. In 239 A.D., the Chinese emperor sent an expeditionary force to explore the island, one of the bases for Beijing's current claim of sovereignty over the island. However, no permanent base was settled on the island. Several centuries later, more missions were sent to the island. The island was clearly identified in court records of the Ming dynasty, charted by the explorer Cheng Ho in 1430 and given its current name, Taiwan. Despite this, few Chinese ventured across the treacherous waters of the Straits of Formosa. The island was largely an operational base for...

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This section contains 9,112 words
(approx. 31 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Taiwanese Americans Encyclopedia Article
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Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America
Taiwanese Americans from Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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