Taft-Hartley Act - Research Article from St. James Encyclopedia of Labor History Worldwide

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 11 pages of information about Taft-Hartley Act.
This section contains 3,025 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
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United States 1947

Synopsis

The Taft-Hartley Act was characterized by labor unions at the time of its passage as "the slave-labor law," and many of its congressional proponents thought that the law would inhibit the power of labor unions. Many historians today, however, argue that the act merely codified practices that the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) was implementing at the time. The passage of this law signaled a change in governmental attitudes toward labor, with real restrictions being placed upon the activities of labor unions. Secondary boycotts and the closed shop were outlawed; states were allowed to pass "right-to-work" laws, which in turn prevented unions from compelling workers that they represented from becoming members of the union; and the president was given the power to proclaim a "cooling-off" period in disputes that he deemed to be a threat to national safety or health. Perhaps most importantly...

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This section contains 3,025 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Taft-Hartley Act Encyclopedia Article
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Taft-Hartley Act from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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