Sociological Ethics - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 11 pages of information about Sociological Ethics.
This section contains 3,087 words
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The Sociology of Ethics

Early in the formation of sociology morals and values entered into the picture and influenced sociological thought and practice. A specific concentration such as a "sociology of moral values" may not exist (Durkheim 1993, p. 14), but morality has played a central role in the prevailing concepts that have shaped and molded sociology. This ideology can be seen in the works of individuals such as Karl Marx (1818–1883), Max Weber (1864–1920), and Emile Durkheim (1858–1917). These classical sociologists agreed on issues surrounding industrial capitalism and how values and morals worked to keep a society together; however, they nonetheless differed in their views of the function these elements have and how they change over time.

Although Marx is credited for playing a key role in establishing the field, Weber is the one considered to be the father of sociology. Marx's challenging social criticism was replaced by Weber's...

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This section contains 3,087 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Sociological Ethics Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics
Sociological Ethics from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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