Society, Culture, and the Gothic - Research Article from Gothic Literature

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 240 pages of information about Society, Culture, and the Gothic.
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Society, Culture, and the Gothic

INTRODUCTION
REPRESENTATIVE WORKS
PRIMARY SOURCES
OVERVIEWS
RACE AND THE GOTHIC
WOMEN AND THE GOTHIC
FURTHER READING

Introduction

The Gothic tradition originated in response to a period of rapid and far-reaching societal, cultural, and theological change in eighteenth-century Europe. Works written in this tradition are inherently linked to the social context in which they were created, and a great deal of critical commentary focuses on the representation of societal and cultural fear in the face of the dissolution of tradition, gender roles, oppression, and race in Gothic literature. As scholars have illustrated, people in nineteenth-century Europe and America believed strongly in physiognomy, the theory that physical appearance and "blood" determined and reflected a person's character. The representation of villains and monsters in Gothic literature demonstrates this adherence to physiognomy, as these characters possess physical traits associated with evil—dark eyes...

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This section contains 71,883 words
(approx. 240 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Society, Culture, and the Gothic Encyclopedia Article
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Gothic Literature
Society, Culture, and the Gothic from Gothic Literature. ©2008 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.