Slavery and the Homefront, 1775-1783 - Research Article from Americans at War

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 6┬ápages of information about Slavery and the Homefront, 1775–1783.
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Slavery in the American Colonies

An estimated one-fifth of the population in the American colonies before the Revolution were slaves—more than a half million individuals. Slavery was dispersed unevenly across the colonies, but few white colonists, North or South, could escape knowledge of the institution. Even in the North, slaves (often called servants, which tended to disguise their real status) were part of many households. Among the Patriots, it was not just George Washington and Thomas Jefferson who owned slaves; so did the early Whig leader John Dickinson of Philadelphia. New England families (including the family of Boston Patriot Samuel Adams) often included a slave member. Slaves were sold at auction in Northern ports such as Philadelphia and Newport, Rhode Island; advertisements of slaves for sale (in Boston, unwanted slave children were simply given away) and calls for the return of so-called runaway...

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This section contains 1,657 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Slavery and the Homefront, 1775-1783 Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
Slavery and the Homefront, 1775-1783 from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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