Russell, Bertrand Arthur William (1872-1970) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 89┬ápages of information about Russell, Bertrand Arthur William (1872–1970).
This section contains 26,483 words
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Life and Social Theories

Early Platonism and Hegelianism

Under the influence of J. M. E. McTaggart and F. H. Bradley, Russell came, in his early years at Cambridge, to believe "more or less" in the Absolute and the rest of the apparatus of British Hegelianism. "There was a curious pleasure," Russell wrote in retrospect, "in making oneself believe that time and space are unreal, that matter is an illusion, and that the world really consists of nothing but mind." In a "rash moment," however, he turned "from the disciples to the Master." G. W. F. Hegel's remarks in the philosophy of mathematics he found "both ignorant and stupid," and in other ways Hegel's work appeared a "farrago of confusions." After that Russell was converted by G. E. Moore to a "watered down" version of Plato's theory of Ideas, regarding the subject matter of mathematics as...

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This section contains 26,483 words
(approx. 89 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Russell, Bertrand Arthur William (1872-1970) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Russell, Bertrand Arthur William (1872-1970) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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