Rhythms in Plant Life - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences

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Types of Rhythms

A rhythm is a process that changes regularly and continuously. It can best be represented as a wave, as with light or radio waves, or on a graph where response is plotted against time. The distance between successive peaks or troughs of the wave is then referred to as the period of the rhythm. Rhythms in plants have a range of periods. For example, the circular growth of some stems has a period of less than one hour, but the flowering in some bamboos has a period of seven years. The most widespread rhythms are those with a period of about twenty-four hours, referred to as circadian rhythms (from the Latin circa, meaning "about," and diem, meaning "day"). Some examples of processes that show circadian rhythms are photosynthesis, stomatal movements, root pressure, nitrogen fixation, bioluminescence, cell division, leaf movements, flower opening, and fragrance...

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This section contains 1,028 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Rhythms in Plant Life Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences
Rhythms in Plant Life from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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