Republicanism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 12 pages of information about Republicanism.
This section contains 3,527 words
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Roman Republicanism

The origins of the republican tradition lie in the writings of Roman political thinkers, such as Cicero and Sallust, who lamented and analyzed Rome's transformation into an empire just before the beginning of the common era. They came to be called "republicans" in part because the form of government they favored was that of pre-imperial Rome—a regime for which Cicero popularized the name "the republic." They are also called "republicans" because of the features of that government that they seized upon when arguing that rule by the republic's government was superior to imperial rule. The words "republic" and "republicanism" derive from the Latin phrase res publica, which means "public matter."

According to these thinkers, the republic was better suited to advance the common good of the Roman people than the empire was because, unlike the empire, its government was participatory. It was governed by public-spirited...

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This section contains 3,527 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Republicanism Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Republicanism from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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