Replication - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 9 pages of information about Replication.
This section contains 2,420 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
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Overview

The DNAs that make up the genomes of bacteria and eukaryotic cells are double-stranded molecules in which each strand is composed of subunits called nucleotides. DNA nucleotides have a direction, in the same way that an arrow has a head and a tail. In DNA strands, the head is the 3′ ("three prime") end of the strand, and the tail is the 5′ ("five prime") end. As a result, each strand also has a direction, whose ends are referred to as the 3′ and 5′ ends. The two strands of DNA run in opposite directions, and are wound around each other in a double helix, with the strands held together by hydrogen bonds between paired bases of the nucleotides (A pairs with T, and G pairs with C).

During the process of DNA replication, the strands are unwound by an enzyme called DNA helicase, and a new strand...

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This section contains 2,420 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Replication Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Macmillan Science Library: Genetics
Replication from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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