Reformed Christianity - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religious Practices

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 298 pages of information about Reformed Christianity.
This section contains 3,546 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Reformed Christianity Encyclopedia Article

Christianity: Reformed Christianity

Overview

Reformed Christianity emerged in the sixteenth century out of the Lutheran and Anabaptist traditions of the Protestant Reformation. "Reformed" refers to a number of church bodies worldwide. The World Alliance of Reformed Churches, a voluntary organization, represents approximately 70 percent of the world's Reformed Christians. In 2003 it had 218 churches in 107 countries with more than 75 million members (who subscribed to more than 60 different confessions of faith). Most churches are called Congregational, Presbyterian, Reformed, and United, and most are minorities in their countries.

Reformed churches are diverse, but they share a common heritage going back to John Calvin (1509–64) and other important figures. These theologians stressed God's freedom as well as his desire to enter into covenantal relationships with humanity. They believed that God worked through the Old Testament nation of Israel and ultimately sent Jesus Christ into the world to live and die and be raised...

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This section contains 3,546 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Reformed Christianity Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Religious Practices
Reformed Christianity from Encyclopedia of Religious Practices. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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