Protest Movements - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Sociology

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 15 pages of information about Protest Movements.
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Protest Participants and Methods of Protest

If protest participants could alleviate their grievances or sense of injustice individually, there would be no likely motivation for them to become active in a protest movement. Protest participants thus have two central characteristics: (1) they have insufficient influence to gain a desired change in their circumstances, and (2) they seek active association with relatively like-minded persons to gain relief from their aggrieved state.

These two characteristics can be seen among protest participants over time and in different locales. In the 1960s civil rights movements in the United States, leading activists—including blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, and women—expressed a strong sense of unequal treatment and opportunity while associating with and supporting activists to achieve equal opportunities in schools, jobs, elected offices, and other social settings. College students, the most active participants in the civil rights movement, could not generally be characterized...

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This section contains 4,439 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Protest Movements Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Sociology
Protest Movements from Encyclopedia of Sociology. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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