Positivism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 19 pages of information about Positivism.
This section contains 5,553 words
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Positivism

The term positivism was used first by Henri, Comte de Saint-Simon to designate scientific method and its extension to philosophy. Adopted by Auguste Comte, it came to designate a great philosophical movement which, in the second half of the nineteenth century and the first decades of the twentieth, was powerful in all the countries of the Western world.

The characteristic theses of positivism are that science is the only valid knowledge and facts the only possible objects of knowledge; that philosophy does not possess a method different from science; and that the task of philosophy is to find the general principles common to all the sciences and to use these principles as guides to human conduct and as the basis of social organization. Positivism, consequently, denies the existence or intelligibility of forces or substances that go beyond facts and the laws ascertained by science. It opposes any kind...

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This section contains 5,553 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Positivism Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Positivism from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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