Pope, Alexander (1688–1744) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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Pope, Alexander(1688–1744)

Alexander Pope, England's leading poet of the Age of Reason, was born in London, the son of a prosperous Roman Catholic linen draper. His Catholicism barred him from public school and university; and he was educated by private tutors and by extensive reading and study on his own, largely at Binfield in Windsor Forest, where his father had retired. About the age of twelve, a severe illness stunted Pope's growth and deformed his spine, and for the rest of his life he was infirm. His devotion to poetry came early, and his genius was immediately recognized by William Wycherley and William Walsh. Early publications of note include the Pastorals (1709), An Essay on Criticism (1711), The Rape of the Lock (1712, enlarged 1714), and Windsor Forest (1714). During frequent visits to London, he became the friend of many prominent literary figures: Jonathan Swift, Joseph Addison, Richard Steele, John Arbuthnot...

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This section contains 1,950 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Pope, Alexander (1688–1744) Encyclopedia Article
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Pope, Alexander (1688–1744) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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