Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 17┬ápages of information about Pascal, Blaise (1623–1662).
This section contains 4,830 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662) Encyclopedia Article

Mathematics and Physics

Pascal was a prodigy, privately educated by his father, who was an excellent mathematician. His father wanted his son to have a good humanistic background before he learned mathematics and science, but at the age of twelve, Pascal discovered by himself the principles of geometry. When his father realized this, he abandoned his original plan for his son's education and encouraged his mathematical development. While still a teenager, Pascal published important mathematical and scientific papers and was a young prodigy in the Parisian intellectual circles. His father and he became members of a scientific discussion group organized by Father Marin Mersenne. There he would have met a wide range of people, probably including Thomas Hobbes, Descartes, and others. At sixteen, Pascal wrote his first major work, Essai pour les coniques (published in 1640), which his sister reported was "considered so great an intellectual achievement that...

(read more)

This section contains 4,830 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662) Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook