Parent-Child Relationships - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 9 pages of information about Parent-Child Relationships.
This section contains 2,437 words
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Infancy

A baby cries, a parent feeds her; a baby snuggles, a parent hugs her. Day after day, night after night, mothers and fathers feed, burp, wash, change, dress, and hold their babies. Out of these interactions, feelings and expectations grow. The baby feels distressed and hungry, then satisfied; the parent feels tenderness, joy, annoyance, exhaustion, pleasure. Gradually, the baby begins to expect that her parent will care for her when she cries. Gradually, parents respond to and even anticipate their baby's needs. These elements form the basis for a developing relationship, a combination of behaviors, interactions, feelings, and expectations that are unique to a particular parent and a particular child.

By the end of the first year, most infants who are cared for in families develop an attachment relationship, usually with the primary caretaker. This relationship is central to the child's development.

Developmental psychologists have studied attachment...

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This section contains 2,437 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Parent-Child Relationships Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence
Parent-Child Relationships from Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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