Operant Conditioning - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Management

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 5 pages of information about Operant Conditioning.
This section contains 1,405 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Operant Conditioning Encyclopedia Article

Simply put, operant conditioning refers to a systematic program of rewards and punishments to influence behavior or bring about desired behavior. Operant conditioning relies on two basic assumptions about human experience and psychology: (1) a particular act results in an experience that is a consequence of that act and (2) the perceived quality of an act's consequence affects future behavior. In addition, a central idea of operant conditioning holds that the main influences on behavior are external—that is, it is in a person's external environment that his or her behavior is programmed.

The Harvard psychologist B.F. Skinner pioneered the field of behaviorism in the late 1930s and continued to contribute to it through the mid-1970s. Operant conditioning is one of the key concepts of this school of psychology. Skinner called his brand of conditioning operant conditioning to distinguish it from the conditioning theory developed by...

(read more)

This section contains 1,405 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Operant Conditioning Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Gale
Operant Conditioning from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook