Observatories, Ground - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Space Sciences

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Observatories, Ground

Astronomers study the universe by measuring electromagnetic radiation—gamma rays, X rays, optical and infrared radiation, and radio waves—emitted by planets, stars, galaxies, and other distant objects. Because Earth's atmosphere is transparent to optical and infrared radiation and to radio waves, these types of radiation can be studied from ground-based observatories. Astronomers must launch telescopes into space in order to study X rays, gamma rays, and other radiation that is blocked by absorption in Earth's atmosphere.

Astronomers make use of ground-based observatories whenever they can. It is about 1,000 times cheaper to build a telescope of a given size on the ground than to launch it into space, so it is much more economical to operate on the surface of Earth.

This telescope is housed inside the interior dome of the Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii. Situated on a volcano, Mauna Kea is considered one of the world's best sites for optical and infrared astronomy. This telescope is housed inside the interior dome of the Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii. Situated on a volcano, Mauna...

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This section contains 2,503 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Observatories, Ground Encyclopedia Article
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Observatories, Ground from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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