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Research Article: Nineteenth-Century Biological Theories on Race

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 6 pages of information about Nineteenth-Century Biological Theories on Race.
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Nineteenth-Century Biological Theories on Race

Overview

In 1848 the whole of Europe was plagued by revolution. Fueled by nationalist and ethnic individual interests, these revolutions were a symptom of change in how men viewed the concept of race. Drawing upon biological theories of the day, the European revolutionaries of the mid-nineteenth century formulated a social theory of race that served their nationalist interests. In a mesh of scientific inquiry and political dogma, the terms race and ethnicity were used interchangeably. Although the conflicts brought upon by the transfer, and in most cases misappropriation, of scientific ideas to the social concepts of race were not limited to the nineteenth century, this era spawned many of the modern conceptions and misconceptions concerning race.

Background

As European contact with distant places and different peoples became commonplace, the desire to explain both physical and cultural differences increased. European conquistadors and...

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This section contains 1,695 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Nineteenth-Century Biological Theories on Race Encyclopedia Article
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