Native American Relations - Research Article from Shaping of America, 1783-1815 Reference Library

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 41 pages of information about Native American Relations.
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By the American Revolution (1775–83), population growth in the thirteen original colonies had pushed most Native Americans inland across the Appalachian Mountains. Even there, the Native Americans had begun to see a few hardy white settlers, who had crossed the Appalachians to farm the fertile lands in the Ohio River valley. The Native Americans lived in small groups thinly spread across the countryside, and to the white frontiersmen, it seemed they were not making full use of the land. Therefore, the white settlers reasoned that the land was an open, unclaimed, untamed wilderness available for the taking.

The loss of their homelands along the coast and the continuing westward expansion of the United States led to strong resentment among the Native American peoples. When the American Revolution broke out in 1775, some thirty-five thousand Native American warriors lived in the frontier region west of the Appalachian Mountains and...

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This section contains 1,050 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Native American Relations Encyclopedia Article
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Shaping of America, 1783-1815 Reference Library
Native American Relations from Shaping of America, 1783-1815 Reference Library. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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