Motion Pictures During World Wars I and II - Research Article from Americans at War

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 7 pages of information about Motion Pictures During World Wars I and II.
This section contains 1,995 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Motion Pictures During World Wars I and II Encyclopedia Article

The Early Years

The history of cooperation between Hollywood studios and the War Department/Department of Defense is almost as old as the history of American cinema itself. In 1914, barely twenty years after Thomas Edison's first moving pictures were exhibited in New York City, filmmaker D. W. Griffith employed engineers from West Point as technical advisors on his Civil War epic, Birth of a Nation (1915). The film startled audiences with its large-scale, realistic battle sequences, and set a standard for spectacle against which all contemporary war and historical films were judged.

The financial and critical success of Birth of a Nation helped to establish the film as a template for the many war movies that would follow. Audiences proved willing to overlook certain weaknesses in plot and characterization if the battle scenes were exciting and appeared authentic. To that end, Griffith borrowed...

(read more)

This section contains 1,995 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Motion Pictures During World Wars I and II Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Americans at War
Motion Pictures During World Wars I and II from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook