Minority Groups and the Great Depression - Research Article from Great Depression and New Deal Reference Library

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 13 pages of information about Minority Groups and the Great Depression.
This section contains 3,773 words
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Black Americans

Hard times were nothing new for blacks in America. Southern slavery had ended only a few generations earlier. Racism remained woven into every aspect of life in the United States in the 1920s and was freely expressed in public. With the onset of the Depression in late 1929, minorities began losing jobs at a high rate. By 1932 the unemployment rate for blacks was over 50 percent, ranging up to 75 percent in some communities. Previously, minorities had held jobs as elevator operators, farm laborers, street cleaners, garbage collectors, waiters, and bellhops; suddenly those jobs were needed by the larger white population. White women, many seeking work for the first time, took positions as maids, housekeepers, and cooks—positions traditionally held by black women. Only low-paying, dirty jobs that no one else wanted were left for minorities. In Atlanta, Georgia, the degrading slogan "No Jobs...

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This section contains 3,773 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Minority Groups and the Great Depression Encyclopedia Article
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Great Depression and New Deal Reference Library
Minority Groups and the Great Depression from Great Depression and New Deal Reference Library. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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