Minorities on the Home Front - Research Article from American Homefront in WWII

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 20 pages of information about Minorities on the Home Front.
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Black Americans

When the United States entered World War II in late 1941, the largest racial minority group in the United States was black Americans. They made up about 10 percent of the general population. After being freed from slavery only a few generations earlier, blacks still faced daily racial discrimination. In the South, where 75 percent of black Americans lived, racism was particularly bad. In many Southern states the so-called Jim Crow laws enforced legalized segregation (the separation of blacks and whites) in public places such as schools, theaters, and restaurants. In the North, urban ghettos (a section of a city where minorities live, often with overcrowding and poverty) and slums were growing as blacks migrated from the rural South to seek jobs. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and other organizations fought discrimination and segregation, but progress was slow. Blacks continued to...

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This section contains 5,743 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Minorities on the Home Front Encyclopedia Article
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American Homefront in WWII
Minorities on the Home Front from American Homefront in WWII. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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