Medieval Religion, Science, and Astronomy - Research Article from Science and Its Times

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 6 pages of information about Medieval Religion, Science, and Astronomy.
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Background

Although the origins of astronomy and cosmology (the study of the origin, structure, and evolution of the universe) predate the human written record, by the height of ancient Greek civilization the cause of natural phenomena was attributed to the collective whim of a pantheon of gods. Although monotheistic in the same sense as ancient Judaism, out of this pantheism (a theology that includes multiple gods) arose the idea that there was an infinite being, Plato's (c. 428-c. 347 B.C.), "The One," and Aristotle's "Prime Mover." Aristotle's influence over astronomy and cosmology was to extend for nearly two millennia and, as a set of philosophical and scientific explanations of the universe, Aristotle's assertions ultimately became integral to the tightly interwoven fabric of philosophy, science, and theology that came to dominate the late medieval intellectual landscape.

In his work De caelo, Aristotle discussed the motion of...

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This section contains 1,691 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Medieval Religion, Science, and Astronomy Encyclopedia Article
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Science and Its Times
Medieval Religion, Science, and Astronomy from Science and Its Times. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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