Luddites and Luddism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Luddites and Luddism.
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Origins

The first Luddites were English textile workers who in 1811 and 1812, during the Industrial Revolution, resisted and rebelled against the use of wide-frame knitting machines, shearing machines, and other machines of mass production. The term is based on a mythical Ned Ludd who supposedly led the workers in their resistance. The Luddites, however, were not one unified political group. They reflected their regions and local trade organizations, hence the more appropriate use of the terms Manchester, Yorkshire, and Midland Luddites.

Much of the knitting of stockings and other apparel was done in cottages and small shops by knitters (stockingers) who sometimes owned their own frames but usually rented them from the hosiers (the knitting-frame was invented by William Lee in 1589 and introduced in the Midlands in the mid-1600s). The knitting-frame, operated by an individual at home, could make 600 stitches per minute as opposed to about 100 stitches...

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This section contains 940 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Luddites and Luddism Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics
Luddites and Luddism from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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