Logical Paradoxes - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 30 pages of information about Logical Paradoxes.
This section contains 8,711 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Logical Paradoxes Encyclopedia Article

Logical Paradoxes

A paradox is an argument that derives or appears to derive an absurd conclusion by rigorous deduction from obviously true premises. Perhaps the most famous is Zeno's paradox of the runner, who, before she can reach her destination, first has to reach the point halfway there, and who, before reaching the halfway point, has to reach the quarter point, before which she must reach the point one-eighth of the way to the destination, and so on. The conclusion is that no runner ever reaches her goal, or even gets started.

To contemporary ears the argument does not sound so irresistible, since we can attribute its appeal either to an ambiguity in the use of "never" ("at no point in time" versus "at no point in the sequence") or to a dubious hidden premise that it is impossible to perform infinitely many tasks in a finite time...

(read more)

This section contains 8,711 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Logical Paradoxes Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Logical Paradoxes from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook