Locke, John - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 7 pages of information about Locke, John.
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The Essay

Part One of the Essay is devoted to a refutation of the doctrine of innate ideas, according to which all human beings are born with certain principles already stamped upon their minds. It might seem doubtful that the importance of this doctrine justifies the attention that Locke devotes to it; however, its demolition whets the appetite for a more satisfactory account of the mind.

Locke holds to the view that all human ideas are reducible to experiences, a doctrine known as empiricism. An idea here means anything in the contents of the mind that is definite enough to have a name. Impressions, such as hot and red, received from the external world are the primary source of ideas. But unlike more uncompromising empiricists, such as David Hume, Locke admits of a second source of ideas: reflection upon the operations of human minds. One may observe what...

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This section contains 2,086 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Locke, John Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics
Locke, John from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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