Liberalism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 11 pages of information about Liberalism.
This section contains 3,116 words
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English Liberalism

Traditional English liberalism has rested on a fairly simple concept of liberty—namely, that of freedom from the constraints of the state. In Thomas Hobbes's memorable phrase, "The liberties of subjects depend on the silence of the law." In general, however, English liberals have always been careful not to press this notion to anarchist extremes. They have regarded the state as a necessary institution, ensuring order and law at home, defense against foreign powers, and security of possessions—the three principles John Locke summarized as "life, liberty and property." English liberals have also maintained that the law can be used to extend the liberties of subjects insofar as the law is made to curb and limit the activities of the executive government. Thus, for example, the English laws of habeas corpus, of bail, and of police entry and arrest all constrain or restrain the executive...

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This section contains 3,116 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Liberalism Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Liberalism from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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