Jazz - Research Article from St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 9 pages of information about Jazz.
This section contains 2,445 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
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Jazz

Of all the great American musical forms—blues, rock 'n' roll, country, and jazz—jazz has proven to be the most subtle, the most flexible, the most capable of growth and change, the one which has developed from folk art and popular art to fine art. Due partly to the extraordinary talents and innovators who have dotted the history of jazz, the wide range of artistic possibilities available to jazz are inherent in the form itself: a music which is structured enough to permit intricate compositions for ensemble play, but loose enough to allow for individual improvisation, individual style and voicing, and considerable virtuosity.

Jazz developed around the turn of the twentieth century in the South and Southwest, particularly New Orleans. It built on a number of earlier African American musical forms, including blues and ragtime, and European-influenced popular music and dances. The first great New...

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This section contains 2,445 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Jazz Encyclopedia Article
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St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture
Jazz from St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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