Inventing a Nation: the U.s. Constitution - Research Article from Shaping of America, 1783-1815 Reference Library

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Inventing a Nation: the U.s. Constitution

By 1787, only a few years after Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation, it became clear that the document was inadequate for governing the new nation. The United States of America was in crisis because the governmental system set up by the Articles did not work: Congress could not collect taxes to run the government or pay its debts. With no income, Congress could not raise a military force to protect U.S. territories west of the Appalachian Mountains (the Native Americans, the British, and the Spanish all wanted to use this land and continued to test America's strength in the region). Congress had no power to control trade competition between the thirteen states or to resolve issues over the value of thirteen different state currencies. Neither could it control trade with foreign nations. Few...

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This section contains 6,362 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Inventing a Nation: the U.s. Constitution Encyclopedia Article
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Inventing a Nation: the U.s. Constitution from UXL. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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