Interregnum (Between Medieval and Modern) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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Valla

The first author to consider is the humanist Lorenzo Valla (1407–1457), best remembered for his writing on the forged donation of Constantine. In his Dialecticarum Libri Tres (1441), Valla gave no definitions of syllogistic figures and moods, evidently assuming that the reader would know about these. His aim was to confine the syllogistic to the first two figures, without the five moods of Theophrastus and Eudemus. To do this he would have had to reject subalternation, conversion, and reductio ad absurdum. About subalternation he was inconsistent; conversion he rejected as lacking brevity, ease, pleasantness, and utility; reductio ad absurdum he largely neglected. The five offending moods were called "Agrippine births," and of them all the most monstrous was "Frisemomorum, forsooth!"

Here we see the common humanist objection to the barbarity of scholastic terminology, but of course Valla was not objecting merely to comparatively recent Scholastics...

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This section contains 2,855 words
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Interregnum (Between Medieval and Modern) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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