Instructional Communication - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Communication and Information

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 13 pages of information about Instructional Communication.
This section contains 3,865 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Instructional Communication Encyclopedia Article

Empirical Inquiry

Since at least 1896, scholars have used empirical research methodology to shed light on what it means to be an effective teacher. As have their colleagues in other social and behavioral sciences, these researchers have operated largely within the language and logic of logical empiricism—a perspective that some have called "the orthodox consensus." Modeled after the approach of the natural sciences, logical empiricism has produced a variety of approaches to instructional communication research ranging, for example, from naturalistic descriptions of teacher classroom behaviors to tightly controlled experiments that manipulate such variables as teacher clarity and teacher humor in order to assess their effect on student learning. Underlying the many varieties of positivist logic are several assumptions:

  1. Reality exists independent of both the research and the flux of sensory experiences. The knower and the known are separate entities.
  2. There is a deterministic order to reality-for people...

(read more)

This section contains 3,865 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Instructional Communication Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Communication and Information
Instructional Communication from Encyclopedia of Communication and Information. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook