Incarnation - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religion

Jodi Meadows
This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 15 pages of information about Incarnation.
This section contains 4,483 words
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The "Primitive" Tradition

The belief in the divine incarnate can be attested as early as the late Paleolithic period, in a considerable number of pictures of human beings in animal forms, often in dancing posture. Among the best known is a figure of the "great sorcerer" in a Trois Frères cave, sporting a deer's head crowned with huge antlers. The same cave has also preserved the portrayal of a dancer disguised as a bison, playing a bow-shaped instrument, possibly a kind of flute. It is certain that the early hunters wore masks and skins of animals for the celebration of their magico-religious ceremonies. These masked figures and many parallel examples were probably believed to be the incarnations of spirits or divine beings akin to the Lord of the Animals.

Wearing masks has been one technique for incarnating souls or spirits in premodern societies. In Inner...

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This section contains 4,483 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Incarnation Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Religion
Incarnation from Encyclopedia of Religion. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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