Huxley, Thomas Henry (1825-1895) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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The Nature of Science

For Huxley, two aspects of the sciences were of special importance. One was their historical continuity with modes of thought used by men in the ordinary commerce of life. "Science," he once said, "is nothing but trained and organized common sense, differing from the latter only as a veteran may differ from a raw recruit … . The man of science, in fact, simply uses with scrupulous exactness the methods which we all habitually use carelessly" (Collected Essays, Vol. III, pp. 45–46). Hence there is a unity of procedure in all the sciences. This was the other aspect of the sciences that he deemed important, because it allowed a specification to be given of the steps that must be taken if the procedure is to be properly carried out. In an essay of 1854, "On the Educational Value of the Natural History Sciences" (Collected...

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This section contains 3,144 words
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Huxley, Thomas Henry (1825-1895) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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