Humanism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Sociology

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 12 pages of information about Humanism.
This section contains 3,449 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
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Humanism

Humanism in its broadest sense can be traced to the philosophical movement that originated in Italy in the second half of the fourteenth century and that affirmed the dignity of the human being. Although over the centuries there have been numerous varieties of humanism, both religious and nonreligious, all have been in agreement on the basic tenet that every human being has dignity and worth and therefore should be the measure of all things.

Humanism, as practiced in sociology, starts from two fundamental assumptions. The first of these is that sociology should be a moral enterprise, one whose fundamental purpose is to challenge the views and conditions that restrain human potential in a given society. The second is that sociology should not be defined as a scientific discipline that embraces "positivism"—the position that facts exist independently of the observer and that the observer should be a...

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This section contains 3,449 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Humanism Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Sociology
Humanism from Encyclopedia of Sociology. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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