Hormones - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 7 pages of information about Hormones.
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Hypothalamus

Most hormones are released into the bloodstream by a single gland. Testosterone is an exception, because it is secreted by both the adrenal glands and by the testes. The major site that keeps track of hormone levels is the hypothalamus. A number of hormones are secreted by the hypothalamus, and they stimulate or inhibit the secretion of hormones at other sites. When the hypothalamus detects high levels of a hormone, it reacts to inhibit further production. When low levels of a hormone are detected, the hypothalamus reacts to stimulate hormone production or secretion. The body handles the hormone estrogen differently. Each month, the Graafian follicle in the ovary releases increasing amounts of estrogen into the bloodstream as the egg develops. When estrogen levels rise to a certain point, the pituitary gland secretes luteinizing hormone (LH) which triggers the egg's release into the oviduct.

The major hormones secreted by...

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This section contains 2,008 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Hormones Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence
Hormones from Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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