Herder, Johann Gottfried (1744–1803) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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Herder, Johann Gottfried(1744–1803)

Johann Gottfried Herder, German philosopher and critic, was born in Mohrungen in East Prussia. His father was a schoolteacher and he grew up in humble circumstances. In 1762 he enrolled at the University of Königsberg, where he studied with Kant, who accorded him special privileges due to his unusual intellectual abilities. At this period he also began a lifelong friendship with the irrationalist philosopher Johann Georg Hamann. In 1764 he left Königsberg to take up a schoolteaching position in Riga. There he wrote the programmatic essay How Philosophy Can Become More Universal and Useful for the Benefit of the People (1765); published his first major work, on the philosophy of language and literature, the Fragments on Recent German Literature (1767–1768); and also an important work in aesthetics, the Critical Forests (1769). In 1769 he resigned his position and traveled—first...

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This section contains 4,419 words
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Buy the Herder, Johann Gottfried (1744–1803) Encyclopedia Article
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Herder, Johann Gottfried (1744–1803) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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