Hearst, William Randolph (1863-1951) - Research Article from St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Hearst, William Randolph (1863-1951).
This section contains 1,138 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Hearst, William Randolph (1863-1951) Encyclopedia Article

Larger-than-life American publisher William Randolph Hearst acquired his first newspaper, the San Francisco Examiner, in 1886. Over the next two decades, he built a media empire which revolutionized journalism. His dictatorial style and sensational approach to the news generated a fortune as well as controversy. Hearst's seemingly limitless ambition led him to campaign for social reforms, serve in Congress, run for the presidency, famously ignite the Spanish-American war, and become, according to recent biographer Ben Proctor, "arguably the best-known American, not just in the United States but around the world."

In the eyes of many, Hearst personified the American dream. Born to Phoebe Apperson, a Missouri school teacher, and George Hearst, a self-made millionaire miner and rancher, William Randolph Hearst parlayed family support, fierce independence, and a sense for drama into enormous wealth and power. In 1880 his father acquired the Examiner as payment...

(read more)

This section contains 1,138 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Hearst, William Randolph (1863-1951) Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Gale
Hearst, William Randolph (1863-1951) from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook