Hawaiians - Research Article from Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 24 pages of information about Hawaiians.
This section contains 7,105 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
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Overview

History

The islands in the triangle formed (roughly) by Tahiti, New Zealand, and Hawaii are inhabited by people who possess prominent genealogical traits in common, speak related languages, and live similar lifestyles. They are descendants of Polynesians (Polynesia is Greek for "many islands"), who began settling in the South Pacific islands around 1100 B.C. They are believed to have reached the Hawaiian islands sometime between A.D. 300 and 500. They called the largest island Havaiki after one of the major islands of their former home. Dogs, pigs, chickens, tuber (taro), coconuts, bananas, breadfruit, yams, and sugar cane comprised much of the traditional Polynesian diet. The mulberry plant called wauke was pounded and bleached to make kapa or bark-cloth. Ti, a lily, provided leaves for hula skirts and roots to weave into matting or brew into a liquor called okolehao.

The population of native Hawaiians has diminished considerably since Western...

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This section contains 7,105 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Hawaiians Encyclopedia Article
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Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America
Hawaiians from Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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