Gps (Global Positioning System) - Research Article from World of Earth Science

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Gps (Global Positioning System)

Long before the space age, people used the heavens for navigation. Besides relying on the Sun, Moon, and stars, the early travelers invented the magnetic compass, the sextant, and the seagoing chronometer. Eventually, radio navigation in which a position could be determined by receiving radio signals broadcast from multiple transmitters came into existence. Improved high frequency signals gave greater accuracy of position, but they were blocked by mountains and could not bend over the horizon. This limitation was overcome by moving the transmitters into space on Earth-orbiting satellites, where high frequency signals could accurately cover wide areas.

The principle of satellite navigation is relatively simple. When a transmitter moves toward an observer, radio waves have a higher frequency, just like a train's horn sounds higher as it approaches a listener. A transmitter's signal will have a lower frequency when it moves away...

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This section contains 769 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Gps (Global Positioning System) Encyclopedia Article
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Gps (Global Positioning System) from World of Earth Science. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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