Gnosticism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 24 pages of information about Gnosticism.
This section contains 6,939 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Gnosticism Encyclopedia Article

Gnostic Teachers and Schools

A number of gnostic teachers and writers are known by name (mainly those listed as heresiarchs in the patristic refutations), but much of the surviving literature is anonymous or pseudepigraphic, in keeping with the revelatory style in which it is cast. Historical individuals whose thought is documented by either critical accounts or direct fragments of their works include the Samaritan Simon Magus and his spiritual descendants Menander, Saturninus, Cerinthus, and Cerdon (first and second centuries); the Alexandrians Carpocrates, Basilides and his son Isidore, and, foremost, Valentinus with his illustrious disciples Ptolemaeus, Heracleon, Theodotus, and Marcus (second century); the Pontian Marcion and the Syrian Bardesanes (second century); and the Persian-Babylonian Mani (third century). Major sects whose doctrines are well documented but not identified by individual authors or founders are, in the Christian camp, the Barbeliotes, Sethites, and Ophites (the last actually a cluster of sects); in...

(read more)

This section contains 6,939 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Gnosticism Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Gnosticism from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook