Generals' Wives: Martha Washington, Catharine Greene, Lucy Knox - Research Article from Americans at War

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After the Revolution

All three generals' wives faced various private and public pressures after the war. Martha Washington's duties as mistress of Mount Vernon increased as visitors consulting with her husband multiplied. Her social graces and experience at handling a large household stood her in good stead then and when her husband became president.

Although the Washingtons did have financial concerns, they were nothing like the problems facing the Greenes and Knoxes. Economic necessity drove the Greenes south. Unable to pick up where he left off in Rhode Island, and with debts from the war, Nathanael Greene gratefully accepted lands offered by South Carolina and Georgia. Still, when he died in 1785 he left his wife and children in a financial bind. Catharine Greene had to go to friends for help and practice the stringent housewifery she so despised. She learned to...

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This section contains 1,232 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Generals' Wives: Martha Washington, Catharine Greene, Lucy Knox Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
Generals' Wives: Martha Washington, Catharine Greene, Lucy Knox from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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