Gasoline and Additives - Research Article from Macmillan Encyclopedia of Energy

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Growing Demand for Gasoline

At the end of the nineteenth century, virtually all of the gasoline produced (around 6 million barrels) was used as a solvent by industry, including chemical and metallurgical plants and dry cleaning establishments, and as kerosene for domestic stoves and space heaters. But by 1919, when the United States produced 87.5 million barrels of gasoline, 85 percent was consumed by the internal combustion engine (in automobiles, trucks, tractors, and motorboats).

Between 1899 and 1919, as demand for gasoline grew, the price increased more than 135 percent, from 10.8 cents/gal to 25.4 cents/gal. From 1929 to 1941, gasoline use by passenger cars increased from 256.7 million barrels to 291.5 million barrels. Consumption of aviation fuel went from only 753,000 barrels in 1929 to over 6.4 million barrels at the start of World War II. By 1941, gasoline accounted for over one-half of petroleum products with 90 percent of gasoline output used as fuel for automotive and aircraft engines.

Between 1948 and...

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This section contains 5,906 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Gasoline and Additives Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Encyclopedia of Energy
Gasoline and Additives from Macmillan Encyclopedia of Energy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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