Food and Drug Agencies - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 11 pages of information about Food and Drug Agencies.
This section contains 3,167 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Food and Drug Agencies Encyclopedia Article

Early History

During the Latin Middle Ages writers of herbals and medical treatises expressed ethical qualms about adulteration and proposed remedies. These writers found that scarcity of supply played a role in fraudulent practices. In 1202 King John instituted the first English food law, which prohibited the admixture of inferior ingredients in publicly sold bread. In Germany and France rulers passed statutes that fined brewers for doctoring beer and wine. Arabs of medieval Islam appointed police officers to test the genuineness of foods and drugs in markets. Medicinal compounds had to be prepared before a supervisor, who was the guarantor of the drug's purity.

With the European voyages of discovery in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, new foods and herbal drugs became part of an expanding global marketplace. To preserve foods on long journeys, producers and transporters used chemicals to retard spoilage and color foods. These practices...

(read more)

This section contains 3,167 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Food and Drug Agencies Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics
Food and Drug Agencies from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook