Everyday Living - Research Article from Great Depression and New Deal Reference Library

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 23 pages of information about Everyday Living.
This section contains 6,719 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
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The Middle Class

In 1935 and 1936 the median family income was $1,160. Families whose yearly income ranged between $1,000 and $2,500 were considered middle class. Depending on where the family fell within that range, they spent 75 to 100 percent of their income on basic necessities such as food, clothing, and shelter. A typical wage-earning, middle-class family in 1935 consisted of a husband and wife and two children living in a six-room house, either owned or rented, or in a four- to five-room apartment. The maintenance of a comfortable lifestyle often depended on how well the household budget was organized and how well the family adhered to it. Responsibility for the budget frequently fell to the mother of the family. Special budgeting sections appeared in women's magazines, and women would send in personal accounts of how they managed their budgets. Magazines even ran contests for the perfect budget.

Taking Care of Family Needs

The middle-class...

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This section contains 6,719 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Everyday Living Encyclopedia Article
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Great Depression and New Deal Reference Library
Everyday Living from Great Depression and New Deal Reference Library. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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