Decline or Revival? Changing Currents in the American Religious Experience - Research Article from Sixties in America Reference Library

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Questioning the Protestant Mainstream

The United States had long prided itself on its religious diversity. Founded as a refuge for those fleeing religious persecution in Europe, the United States had in principle been very tolerant of religious diversity. In practice, however, Protestant churches—especially the mainstream Baptist, Methodist, Episcopalian, Presbyterian, and Lutheran churches—dominated the religious landscape. Other major world religions—especially Catholicism and Judaism—occupied a position decidedly outside the mainstream. Before World War II (1939–45), members of non-Protestant religions had suffered from de facto segregation: Catholics and Jews often found it difficult to gain public office and were often distrusted by the Protestant majority because of their religious views. But World War II began to change this dynamic. Justly proud of their role as champions of freedom and appalled by the way German Nazis...

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This section contains 4,193 words
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Buy the Decline or Revival? Changing Currents in the American Religious Experience Encyclopedia Article
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Sixties in America Reference Library
Decline or Revival? Changing Currents in the American Religious Experience from Sixties in America Reference Library. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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