Dead Sea Scrolls - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religion

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 9 pages of information about Dead Sea Scrolls.
This section contains 2,428 words
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Discovery

In the second half of the nineteenth century, Hebrew manuscripts discovered in the genizah ("storehouse") of the Ben Ezra synagogue in Cairo began circulating in Europe. Much of this collection, known as the Cairo Genizah, was acquired for the University of Cambridge by Solomon Schechter in 1896. Among these texts was a strange composition, known as the Zadokite Fragments or the Damascus Document, that outlined the life and teachings of a Jewish sect. Eventually, this same text was found at Qumran.

There, in 1947, a young bedouin entered what is now designated Cave I and found a group of pottery jars containing leather scrolls wrapped in linen cloths. These scrolls, the first finds, were sold to Athanasius Samuel, the Syrian metropolitan of Jerusalem, and to Eliezer Sukenik, a professor representing the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The scrolls in the possession of the Syrian metropolitan were purchased in 1954 by...

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This section contains 2,428 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Dead Sea Scrolls Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Religion
Dead Sea Scrolls from Encyclopedia of Religion. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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