Cousteau, Jacques-Yves (1910-1997) - Research Article from World of Earth Science

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 9 pages of information about Cousteau, Jacques-Yves (1910-1997).
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French oceanographer

Jacques Cousteau was known as the co-inventor of the aqualung, along with his television programs, feature-length films, and books, all of which have showcased his research on the wonders of the marine world. Cousteau helped demystify undersea life, documenting its remarkable variety, its interdependence, and its fragility. Through the Cousteau Society, which he founded, Cousteau led efforts to call attention to environmental problems and to reduce marine pollution.

Jacques-Yves Cousteau was born in St. André-de-Cubzac, France, on June 11, 1910 to Elizabeth Duranthon and Daniel Cousteau. Jacques, for the first seven years of his life, suffered from chronic enteritis, a painful intestinal condition. In 1918, after the Treaty of Versailles, Daniel found work as legal adviser to Eugene Higgins, a wealthy New York expatriate. Higgins traveled extensively throughout Europe, with the Cousteau family in tow. Cousteau recorded few memories from his childhood; his earliest...

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This section contains 2,412 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Cousteau, Jacques-Yves (1910-1997) Encyclopedia Article
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