Cousin, Victor (1792-1867) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 8┬ápages of information about Cousin, Victor (1792–1867).
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Eclecticism

Though Cousin started his career as a pupil of Laromiguière, it was the commonsense philosophy of Thomas Reid, as interpreted by Royer-Collard, that was the source of his own doctrine. To Cousin common sense was a fusion of the best that had been done in philosophy, combining the empiricism of sensationalism in epistemology with the spiritualism of religion. The epistemology of Étienne Bonnot de Condillac and his school, Cousin felt, because it made the spirit of man a simple passive victim of external forces, had led them to atheism and materialism, both of which were to be condemned. Atheism and materialism could not give men those permanent principles that would guide their moral life. Such principles were to be found only if men realized that their minds were active as well as passive, their activity consisting in their use of their...

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This section contains 2,179 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Cousin, Victor (1792-1867) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Cousin, Victor (1792-1867) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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